Diversity & Inclusion

Rutgers Prep is a diverse Independent School. We are diverse in age, ethnicity, nationality, learning style, and culture. On our campus and in our classrooms, we strive to create an environment that is welcoming to people of all religions, races, ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, sexual orientations and gender identities. Rutgers Prep is committed to supporting, encouraging and fostering an open and inclusive community that respects the dignity of each individual, embraces diversity as a means of promoting a learning environment, encourages an exchange of information, values and ideas, and is free from discrimination, harassment and intimidation.
The spirit of inclusion is a core value at Rutgers Preparatory School.

Who We Are

Our faculty members are not only passionate teachers, but passionate people in making this world a better place. Faculty members joined together and created a committee to research information about social justice and diversity. This faculty group is called AID (Advocates for Inclusion in Diversity). AID seeks to harness the strengths that reside in our community’s diversity - including race, gender, ability, ethnicity, religion, financial circumstance, geography, and sexual orientation- to inspire faculty and students to become advocates of social justice. We can be contacted by emailing AID@rutgersprep.org .

What We Do

The mission of Advocates for Inclusion and Diversity (AID) has been primarily focused on providing workshops and resources to explore, gain understanding of, and help faculty minimize implicit and explicit bias. We pledge to continue that work to guide our school community, as we continually strive to create a more inclusive school environment. From its inception AID’s Mission has been “to harness the strengths that reside in our community’s diversity - including race, gender, ability, ethnicity, religion, financial circumstance, geography, and sexual orientation - to inspire faculty and students to become advocates of social justice.

Diversity & Inclusion in ....

In the Lower School, we will use established diversity awareness months to add to our curriculum. Our main goal will be to ensure that our classrooms highlight differences and place value on those differences.  To do that,  we will use grade appropriate lessons with literature representing diverse perspectives.  As Rudine Sims Bishop explained, “Books are sometimes windows, offering views of worlds that may be real or imagined, familiar or strange. These windows are also sliding glass doors, and readers have only to walk through in imagination to become part of whatever world has been created or recreated by the author. When lighting conditions are just right, however, a window can also be a mirror. Literature transforms human experience and reflects it back to us, and in that reflection, we can see our own lives and experiences as part of the larger human experience. Reading, then, becomes a means of self-affirmation, and readers often seek their mirrors in books.” The LS is also examining the ways in which we teach holidays and celebrations to ensure that we are encapsulating authentic voices. There will be a parent committee working with the LS AID subcommittee to provide feedback and make recommendations regarding resources that can be used to create more structured and actively anti-racist programming. The LS curriculum is still being developed for each grade level.

In the Middle School, History 7 & B are now called American Founders (grade 7) and Civics and Citizenship (grade 8).  History 7 starts with materials from the 1619 project and weaves them into an exploration of the American founding, covering the period from Jamestown to 1861.  History 8 is focused on the adoption of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments and how they reshape the republic from 1865 forward.  In both classes, we will use an assortment of historical documents as well as America: History of Our Nation textbook. Summer reading for grade 8 is a collection of readings to get students engaged in the content of the Civics and Citizenship class: segments from The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, an essay on Juneteenth by historian Annette Gordon Reed; an essay on Confederate monuments by historian W. Fitzhugh Bondage, a segment on slavery's end in New Jersey from the Princeton University slavery archives, and some Langston Hughes and Richard Wright poems about the Great Migration.

In the Upper School, the Humanities Department has taken a deeper look into ways to incorporate more influences from a full spectrum of diverse voices to strengthen the curriculum. English courses are being structured into thoughtful themes: 9th grade-Finding Your Voice, 10th grade-Progress and Protest, 11th grade-American Literature/American Immigrant Perspectives to broaden the scope of knowledge that our students are studying. Within our History courses, specifically 9th-grade students, the teachers of those courses are taking a more contemporary approach shifting to presenting ancient and modern history in a parallel format.  Beginning with a two-week dive into the complex history of our very own school. We have also taken a look at Divisional Policies.The school administrators on this committee have evaluated both our faculty and parent handbooks to assess our current policies with a renewed lens for potential issues. During the summer, our faculty have been offered the suggestion to read one of the following books - Waking Up White by Debby Irving, White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo, or The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin. We are excited to engage in active conversation and discussion about these titles when we arrive back on campus.

AID Updates

Take the Survey

Your thoughts, suggestions, concerns, ideas, and solutions are important to us all and this survey is one of the many ways we are able to gain insight from you. We plan on using the responses to this survey to implement actions and initiatives for creating a more anti-racist community. Your responses are anonymous unless you choose to identify yourself. Thank you in advance for your partnership.

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Aid Newsletter

Advocates for Inclusion and Diversity (AID) has been an active Faculty Committee for a few years that has been primarily focused on providing workshops and resources to explore, gain an understanding of, and help faculty minimize implicit and explicit bias. We pledge to continue that work to guide our school community, as we continually strive to create a more inclusive school environment. From its inception AID’s Mission has been “to harness the strengths that reside in our community’s diversity - including race, gender, ability, ethnicity, religion, financial circumstance, geography, and sexual orientation - to inspire faculty and students to become advocates of social justice.”

Read More about Aid Newsletter

Programs & Initiatives